3rd International Conference on Cancer Nutrition Therapy

May 9 – May 10, 2012,
Madrid, Spain
Can We Afford to Ignore Fat Metabolism in Cancer Cachexia?
Gerald Höfler, MD
Medical University of Graz
Professor
Institute of Pathology
Head, Laboratory of Molecular Diagnostics and the
Working Group of Molecular Oncology
Graz, Austria
Dr. Höfler presents information on fat metabolism in cancer cachexia. He discusses an animal study where white adipose tissue (WAT) disappeared when tumor tissue was injected into the mice, and the implications this has on cachexia research.
Conference Videos
Dr. Atherton presents data on his work in protein metabolism in patients with colorectal cancer, showing his findings on the recovery of lean muscle mass after surgery with different nutrition options.
Dr. Höfler presents information on fat metabolism in cancer cachexia. He discusses an animal study where white adipose tissue (WAT) disappeared when tumor tissue was injected into the mice, and the implications this has on cachexia research.
Cancer patients are now more likely to be overweight or obese and sarcopenic rather than being clinically underweight. Because cachexia may be present with or without the loss of fat, we must be careful in diagnosing this condition in patients that may not immediately appear to suffer from it.
Dr. Mazurak discusses her findings from an open-label study in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer receiving 1st line chemotherapy to assess the effect of fish oil supplementation on weight loss, skeletal muscle, tumor response, and side effects.
Multimodal Management of Nutritional Problems During Oncological Therapy
A vicious cycle exists in cancer patients between reduced oral intake, decreased physical activity, and inflammation. Therefore, treatment should be multimodal that includes, in addition to anti-cancer therapy, nutrition to increase energy and protein intake, muscle training, and anti-inflammatory drugs.
Cancer Therapy, Cardiac Function and Cachexia
Similar clinical signs and symptoms are found in patients with heart failure and advanced cancer including easy fatigue, dyspnea, significant weight loss, and edema. Dr. von Haehling shows why he believes cardiovascular interventions may help to improve the QoL of patients with cancer and potentially also their survival.

*at no charge